Mysteries of Omniverse—Part I

Recently, we set a challenge for ourselves: to demonstrate the correctness of our “Theory of Everything” by employing our Noetitek™ system to explain anomalies science has encountered in its stymied quest to understand the nature and workings of the universe (and Multiverse, or Omniverse). We knew how to explain such interrelated enigmas as the “missing universe” and the nature of gravity in words and symbols, but we were wishing we had some visual metaphor that could convey the Big Picture holistically, a metaphor capable of triggering an AHA! within the minds of members of our audience, or at least serve as an aid to better understanding our words. 

No map is the territory; no metaphor is the idea it attempts to elucidate. Still, we wanted some simple physical representation of cosmic structure and functioning, something the equivalent of holding in hand the base for a small grid-covered globe that can spin while one ponders Earth. We knew that, although meaningful, the jeweled net of Indra and Buddhist conceptualizing of cosmos have proved inadequate to tease minds toward the next level of understanding while also facilitating bridge-building between metaphysical revelation and scientific articulation. Science uses an Indra-derived “fabric” metaphor along with words like “dynamic” and “flexible” which, although not incorrect, is like talking about the laboratory analysis of cloth when what is desired is knowledge of how the garment worn by a person walking by was made. 

On November 23, 2012, the day after Thanksgiving, I went to bed with this desire in mind. As I was awakening the next morning, a color picture of a simple visual aid popped into my mind: raw eggs broken-out onto the surface of a clear glass pie plate

Each yolk represents a galactic cluster of star systems, and the albumen portion, which has two obvious qualities (thick and thin), spreads out and surrounds the yolk. As additional eggs are placed onto the plate the thick albumen of each egg remains devoted to its yolk such that each yolk’s albumen forms a flexible yet firm boundary at its farthest reaches. The more watery albumen mixes together with that of the other eggs. Because the albumen of the eggs is almost clear, if viewed from within the albumen by an imaginary submicroscopic creature standing at a telescope in a submicroscopic observatory, the boundary separating the contiguous eggs would be invisible. At a short distance from the glass plate, it will even appear to your own eye as if the yellow yolks are all floating in one common puddle of albumen. Yet, like the actual universe, it is not isotropic. 

The presence of this heretofore unrecognized boundary is, we believe, the “missing fundamental” that physicists have been hoping to find in order to answer lesser anomalies and allow completion of their understanding of how the universe really works. As we proceed (in Part II) to address a couple top-rank anomalies and associated puzzles that have stumped science’s best efforts to date, we will make reference to, explore, and expand our use of the synchronistic meaning of our plate-of-raw-eggs metaphor. 

At this point, you might want to read some or all of the following earlier posts, among others: “Cancelling Heisenberg’s Uncertainty,” “Consensus as Anti-Science,” “Cosmic Conundrum Broken,” “Dark Energy,” “Disposing of ‘Occam’s Razor’,” “Formulaic Thinking,” “Genesis 101,” “Multidimensionality and Turbulence Theory,” “Nothing,”  “Our Position on Superposition,” “Primal Cosmic Number Discovered,” “Quantum Enigma Solved,” “Quantum Gravity Quest,” “Quantum Query,” “Space-Time Asymmetry,” “The Color of Time,”  “The Noetitek™ System,” and “Theory of Everything.”

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