Analysis: The “Black Dahlia” Case—Part I

PluribusOne™ Consulting is always seeking new arenas within which to apply its Noetitek™ system, and although we prefer to avoid addressing matters that are gruesome and grotesque, we have been challenged to apply our tools and techniques to some high-profile unsolved crimes. One of the most notorious and mysterious unsolved murders in the USA is the sixty-six-year-old case of Elizabeth Short, known as The Black Dahlia. Experts say that not only does this “coldest cold case” defy solution; they have never even heard a credible theory. 

To very briefly synopsize: In January, 1947, the unclad body of Miss Elizabeth Short, a 22-year-old resident of southern California, was found in a suburban neighborhood. Rather than describe grisly details, which are in ample supply on the internet and elsewhere, suffice it to say that her body had been mutilated more grotesquely than law enforcers had seen previously. The bizarre condition of the bloodless corpse made clear that she had been tortured, beaten, and exsanguinated—or drained of blood after death—by someone who intended that her body be found absent incriminating evidence. 

While some theories point to the murder as having been motivated by hateful vengeance—a jealous woman or rejected wannabe lover—the removal of all blood and separation of the body into halves appears to indicate a murderer having knowledge of medical or funerary procedures. One of the big questions we have not heard anyone ask is: Why dispose of the body in a way that ensures it will be found and also publicized? We believe this was done to prevent her from being deemed “missing,” in which case someone might search for her and discover some darker secret. If the body’s condition was meant to serve as a warning, it must have chilled any witness having useful knowledge. If meant to point a finger at Satanists or the equivalent, then it succeeded. 

Law enforcement investigators performed lengthy and thorough investigations and identified numerous reasonable suspects, but none of the examinations, which employed the best tools and technologies of the day, proved fruitful. Every suggested suspect and scenario, and every self-confessing nutcase, was carefully considered, and many theories—no matter how harebrained—have been pursued over decades, to no avail. Despite the notoriety of the case and the deep desire of countless people to see this heinous crime solved, no murderer was brought to justice. 

Our theory is new, credible, and presents an avenue of inquiry that remains viable for appropriate investigators. We suggest that Betty Short was a victim of government mind-control experimenters. We further speculate that, complicit in her murder, Robert M. “Red” Manley, was also a victim of such experimentation. Manley was the prime suspect until he passed two polygraph tests and was released. Years later, he passed a truth serum (sodium pentothal) interrogation too. One goal of MK-ULTRA experiments was to enable CIA agents to pass precisely such tests. Manley, diagnosed schizophrenic, died in an insane asylum on the 39th anniversary of Betty’s disappearance—an accidental fall.

Before we proceed to share, in Part II, a fresh list of twelve thought-provoking facts and associated speculation, we wish to note the interesting coincidence that there is apparently good evidence that, in 1953, Dr. Frank Olson—said to have fallen from a hotel room window in New York City—was murdered by CIA operatives after they used him as a guinea pig in an LSD experiment. After all these years, just a few days ago a lawsuit was filed against the federal government by Olson’s sons.

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7 Responses to “Analysis: The “Black Dahlia” Case—Part I”

  1. Stark Raven Says:

    You say Manley was complicit, as if that’s a given. He had an alibi for the coroner’s stated date of death.

  2. PluribusOne™ Says:

    We believe that when Manley dropped her off at the hotel on January 9th, he was knowingly handing her over to those who would be using her as a guinea pig. We’re not saying Manley committed the murder, which occurred five or six days later.

    Leaving her body the way it was found would account for Manley saying at first that he did not even know her. He must have felt threatened. When his wife had him committed to the asylum years later, it was in part due to his feelings of depression and guilt.

  3. Stark Raven Says:

    What do you say caused her death?

  4. PluribusOne™ Says:

    She died of a severe concussion while in the company of someone or group. Maybe she “fell,” like Frank Olson and Red Manley would a few years later. Falling down stairs, leaping off rooftops, jumping out of airplanes, diving from bridges, and flying out of windows are common LSD-related causes of death.

  5. Stark Raven Says:

    I know from your treatment of earlier topics that you often withhold the most profound insights while promising a more extensive treatment in a future book. In this case, you ask the question: Why dispose of the body in a way that ensures it will be found and also publicized? but you seem to equivocate in answering that question. In other words, your profound question offers less than profound speculation. Like many people, I sense there is some greater significance to leaving a body spread out like that at roadside. As to the lower half of her corpse, her legs were spread apart in a v-shape, and as to the upper half, her arms are raised like a hold-up victim, and her mouth was made to form an expressionless straight line. What can this mean?

  6. PluribusOne™ Says:

    The insight has been withheld because the matter deserves in-depth discussion to avoid creating confusion by seeming to point a finger at the wrong party—“wrong,” in that we have found no supportive evidence for an allegation that the murder was the work of members of a secret society, per se. Rather, our thinking is that the murderers wanted to create an opportunity for law enforcement to infer that the murder was done by freemasons, like the theory about Jack the Ripper in London.

    Here’s why: If you overlay the upper half of the body onto the lower half it forms (approximately) the compass and square logo of Freemasonry, with her head taking the place of the “G.” There is more to this gruesome symbolism that we will continue to withhold for now. In any case, we are NOT advocating the idea that this murder was the work of freemasons.

  7. PluribusOne™ Says:

    Here’s more: The way the body parts were left can be seen to make the statement that she was “not on the square,” which means that she was something of a liar, thief, cheat and/or betrayer of secrets.

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